Almost all of you who reads this blog would of heard the saying “drive for show, putt for dough”? Well this is definitely the case! Think about a normal round of golf that you play, if you happen to miss a green its almost guaranteed that you will make bogey. If you miss a green but hit a good chip shot to within a few feet of the hole, you have a very good chance of saving your par. So ask yourself how many greens do you miss on average during a round? A good amateur player is going to hit about half the greens, and a higher handicap player is going to miss a few more during a round. For example let’s say you miss 10 greens on average in a round and are a poor chipper, you may get up and down just twice. If you were to just improve your chipping, you could get up and down six times rather than two, which would improve your score by 4 shots!

No matter how long you stand on the driving range smashing drivers, you will never save four shots as quickly from your game as you would with better chipping. The following are five key chipping tips that should quickly help you to see improvement out on the golf course:

  1. Use Your Hands: The worst thing I hear from amateurs when giving a chipping lesson, is that they were told by a friend to chip using a putting motion. Nothing could be further from the truth, because to chip effectively you need to engage your hands and let them work for you. A correct putting stroke uses no hand movement and therefore gets no hinge in the wrists. Hinging the wrists is critical to hitting a good chip shot because it allows the club to get up above the grass level and hit down on the ball with a descending strike
  2. Use One Club: Have you got endless amounts of time to practice working on your game? For most people they only get to practice once or twice a week and for only a short amount of time due to other commitments. Because of this, why try to achieve perfect chipping with several different clubs. Choose one club, preferably a sand wedge or lob wedge and get really good chipping with it. With proper technique, and understanding ball position and weight distribution, you will be able to hit a wide range of shots with the same club. You will also develop confidence in this club the more times you use it over and over again.

 

  1. Make Sure You Get On Green: Not all chips shots are the same, some are from short rough just off the edge of the green with a generous hole position, and others are hit from deep rough off a downslope with no green to work with. When you are setting up to hit the shot your faced with, make sure you evaluate the situation and choose a smart type of shot. There should be one main goal that outweighs all others, and that is to make sure the next shot is a putt. Don’t try to pull off the miracle shot and leave the ball in the same horrid position as before. Even if you leave yourself a long putt, it’s better to be putting from 30 feet than chipping still.

 

  1. Decide Where You Want To Putt From: Unless you actually whole the chip shot your faced with, you are going to have to whole a putt in order to complete the up and down par save. Before you chip, walk around the hole and look at the slope of the putting surface in order to decide exactly where the easiest place will be to putt from. For example if the hole is cut on a flat section of the green, you can take dead aim at the hole and try to chip it as close as possible or inn. However if the hole is cut on a slope you are ideally wanting to make sure your putting uphill as a 10 foot uphill putt is easier than a 5 foot downhill putt. A good leave for par will give you the confidence to knock the putt in and walk off with your par save.

 

I hope these tips have been helpful to you and your scores will lower as a result. If you would like to book a lesson with me please call 613131

 

Christopher Reed

PGA Professional

Westridge Golf Centre